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Farm Injury Statistics

Fatalities:

  • In 2012, 374 farmers and farm workers died from a work-related injury, resulting in a fatality rate of 20.2 deaths per 100,000 workers. Tractor overturns were the leading cause of death for these farmers and farm workers.
  • The most effective way to prevent tractor overturn deaths is the use of a Roll-Over Protective Structure (ROPS). In 2012, 59% of tractors used on farms in the US were equipped with ROPS. If ROPS were placed on all tractors used on US farms manufactured since the mid-1960’s, the prevalence of ROPS-equipped tractors could be increased to over 80%.
  • On average, 113 youth less than 20 years of age die annually from farm-related injuries (1995 -2002), with most of these deaths occurring to youth 16-19 years of age (34%).
  • Of the leading sources of fatal injuries to youth, 23% percent involved machinery (including tractors), 19% involved motor vehicles (including ATVs), and 16% were due to drowning.

Injuries:

  • Every day, about 167 agricultural workers suffer a lost-work-time injury. Five percent of these injuries result in permanent impairment.
  • From 2008-2010, 50% of all hired crop worker injuries were classified as a sprain or strain.
  • In 2012, an estimated 14,000 youth were injured on farms; 2,700 of these injuries were due to farm work.


Costs:
  • Average cost of a work-related fatality was $___________.
  • Average cost of a work-related injury was $___________.
  • Note that these costs are for all industries combined. The cost of an injury or death to the farm owner/operator differ significantly, especially if it disrupts planting, harvesting, etc. In fact, it may even force the farm out of business if there is nobody else that can effectively manage the operation.