Dr. Daniel Mathew
Assistant Professor

 

Tea​ching

 

Contact    

2506 River Drive
234 Brehm Animal Science Building
Knoxville, Tennessee 37996
Phone: (865) 974-3124
Fax: (865) 974-7297
email: dmathew@utk.edu

Education

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Bovine Reproductive Physiology and in vitro Fertilization Laboratory, School of Agriculture and Food Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Republic of Ireland, 2015-2017

Ph.D., Animal Science, Emphasis: Reproductive Physiology, Division of Animal Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA, 2010-2014

M.S., Animal Science, Emphasis: Reproductive Physiology, Division of Animal Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA, 2007-2009

B.S., Animal Science, Emphasis: Science and Technology, Minor: Biological Sciences, Department of Animal Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, 2002-2006

Appointment:  Research 60% | Teaching 40%

 

Professional Interest:  Reproductive Physiology - Embryology and Uterine Biology

I grew up on a family row crop and swine farm in North West Indiana before my family moved to East Tennessee. There, we raised cattle and owned a small beef cow-calf farm. Animal agriculture depends on reproduction and problems associated with reproduction greatly reduce farm productivity. Ultimately, this has a negative impact on U.S. and global agriculture. Pregnancy failure during the first month of gestation, a phenomenon referred to as early embryonic mortality or loss, is a major reproductive issue in large animal livestock. Late embryonic or fetal loss can occur thereafter, although at a lesser rate. Early pregnancy requires complex developmental processes within the embryo and interactions between the embryo and the uterine endometrium. Our research program aims to unravel these processes and/or interactions to identify factors that influence pregnancy success. Our overall goal is to use this information to develop safe technologies that reduce embryonic and fetal loss in cattle, swine and other agriculture related species. Our current research interests include: 1) methods to detect early pregnancy and developmental progression of the early embryo, 2) identifying embryonic and maternal genes and/or interactions that promote a successful pregnancy and 3) characterizing how disease and environment induced stress limit reproduction with the goal of developing strategies to eliminate or control their impact.

 

Selected Publications:

  • Sánchez J. M., D. J. Mathew, C. Passaro, G. Charpigny, S. Behura, T. E. Spencer and P. Lonergan. 2019. Bovine endometrium responds differentially to age-matched short and long conceptuses. Biology of Reproduction doi:1093/biore/ioz060  

  • Mathew D. J., J. M. Sánchez, C. Passaro, G. Charpigny, S. Behura, T. E. Spencer and P. Lonergan. 2018. Interferon tau-dependent and independent effects of the bovine conceptus on the endometrial transcriptome: effect of conceptus origin and sex. Biology of Reproduction 100(2):365-380. doi: 10.1093/biolre/ioy199.  

  • Passaro C., D. Tutt, D. J. Mathew, J. M. Sánchez, J. A. Browne, G. B. Boe-Hansen, T. Fair and P. Lonergan. 2018. Blastocyst-induced changes in the bovine endometrial transcriptome. Reproduction 156(3):219-229. doi: 10.1530/REP-18-0188. 

  • Geisert R. D., J. J. Whyte, A. E. Meyer, D. J. Mathew, M. R. Juarez, M. C. Lucy, R. S. Prather and T. E. Spencer. 2017. Review: Rapid conceptus elongation in the pig: An interleukin 1 beta 2 and estrogen regulated phenomena. Molecular Reproduction Development 84(9):760-774. doi: 10.1002/mrd.22813.  

  • Mathew D. J., M. C. Lucy and R. D. Geisert. 2016. Review: Interleukins, interferons and establishment of pregnancy in pigs. Reproduction 151(6):R111-22. doi: 10.1530/REP-16-0047.

View More Publications