The Tennessee Pest Management Information Network is a component of the Southern IPM Center.

Priorities Developed for Tennessee's 2012 Pest Management Information Network:

Extension (educational) Priorities

  • Distribute fachseet(s) for Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD)
  • Continue to assist with County Surveys for TCD
  • Inservice Training Sessions for Emerald Ash Borer (EAB)
  • Continued development of training materials for the spotted-wing drosophila
  • Inform apple producers about the importance of the brown marmorated stink bug and scout for its presence
  • Develop training materials for the globular stink bug aka kudzu bug
  • Continue to monitor globular stink bug and potential hosts
  • Continue to develop materials for management of hemipteran pests in cotton and soybean
  • Continue inservice training sessions for cogongrass
  • Educational programs developed for good ag. practices for food safety
  • Promote and publish more School IPM Management publications
  • Sudden Oak Death, more descriptive symptomology materials for agent training

Research Priorities

  • Investigate possible methods to reduce populations of the brown marmorated stink bug
  • Investigate methods to cause mating disruption of the spotted-wing drosophila
  • Evaluation of transgenic insecticide and herbicide traits in field crops
  • Investigate replacement management practices for insecticides removed via regulation
  • Develop bed bug management tools

Regulatory Priorities

  • Thousand Cankers Disease, continue to restrict movement of products
  • Emerald Ash Borer, continue to restrict movement of products
  • Continue to monitor surrounding areas of infestation zones for both TCD and EAB
  • Cogongrass, inspect forest service equipment before/after transport
  • Enforcement of phytosanitary laws for interstate movement of vegetable transplants

NOTE: Advisory members indicated that Crop/Pest Profiles older than three years should be updated if at all possible, due to changes in commodity values, acreage and new chemistries of products recommended for control. Information listed above was obtained from stakeholders via phone conversation(s) and/or via e-mail correspondence.


Priorities Developed for Tennessee's 2011 Pest Management Information Network:

Extension (educational) Priorities

  • Development of fachseet(s) for Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD)
  • Assist with County Surveys for TCD
  • Inservice Training Sessions for Emerald Ash Borer (EAB)
  • Development of training materials for the spotted-wing drosophila
  • Inform apple producers about the importance of the brown marmorated stink bug and scout for its presence
  • Develop training materials for the globular stink bug aka kudzu bug
  • Develop materials for management of hemipteran pests in cotton and soybean
  • Continue inservice training sessions for cogongrass
  • Educational programs developed for good ag. practices for food safety
  • Promote and publish more School IPM Management publications
  • Sudden Oak Death, more descriptive symptomology materials for agent training

Research Priorities

  • Investigate possible methods to reduce populations of the brown marmorated stink bug
  • Investigate methods to cause mating disruption of the spotted-wing drosophila
  • Evaluation of transgenic insecticide and herbicide traits in field crops
  • Investigate replacement management practices for insecticides removed via regulation
  • Develop bed bug management tools

Regulatory Priorities

  • Thousand Cankers Disease, continue to restrict movement of products
  • Emerald Ash Borer, continue to restrict movement of products
  • Continue to monitor surrounding areas of infestation zones for both TCD and EAB
  • Cogongrass, inspect forest service equipment before/after transport
  • Enforcement of phytosanitary laws for interstate movement of vegetable transplants

NOTE: Advisory members indicated that Crop/Pest Profiles older than three years should be updated if at all possible, due to changes in commodity values, acreage and new chemistries of products recommended for control. Information listed above was obtained from stakeholders via phone conversation(s) and/or via e-mail correspondence.


Priorities Developed for Tennessee's 2010 Pest Management Information Network:

Extension (educational) Priorities

  • Development of factsheet(s) for Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD)
  • Assist with County Surveys for TCD
  • Inservice Training Sessions for Emerald Ash Borer (EAB)
  • Development of training materials for the spotted-wing drosophila
  • Develop training materials for the globular stink bug aka kudzu bug
  • Develop materials for management of hemipteran pests in cotton and soybean
  • Continue inservice training sessions for cogongrass
  • Educational programs developed for good ag. practices for food safety
  • Promote and publish more School IPM Management publications
  • Sudden Oak Death, more descriptive symptomology materials for agent training

Research Priorities

  • Investigate possible methods to reduce populations of the brown marmorated stink bug
  • Investigate methods to cause mating disruption of the spotted-wing drosophila
  • Evaluation of transgenic insecticide and herbicide traits in field crops
  • Investigate replacement management practices for insecticides removed via regulation
  • Develop bed bug management tools

Regulatory Priorities

  • Thousand Cankers Disease, continue to restrict movement of products
  • Emerald Ash Borer, continue to restrict movement of products
  • Continue to monitor surrounding areas of infestation zones for both TCD and EAB
  • Cogongrass, inspect forest service equipment before/after transport
  • Enforcement of phytosanitary laws for interstate movement of vegetable transplants

NOTE: Advisory members indicated that Crop/Pest Profiles older than three years should be updated if at all possible, due to changes in commodity values, acreage and new chemistries of products recommended for control. Information listed above was obtained from stakeholders via phone conversation(s) and/or via e-mail correspondence.


Priorities Developed for Tennessee's 2009 Pest Management Information Network:

Extension Priorities

  • Educational programs developed for good ag. practices for food safety.
  • Sudden Oak Death, more descriptive symptomology materials for agent training
  • Proper placement of seed treatments (field crops and vegetables)
  • Development of additional pest fact sheets that are easily accessible - Web-based
  • On-farm demonstrations / field days stressing proper calibration of spray equipment
  • Education programs for nursery growers for insect and weed control
  • Programs for Ambrosia beetle identification and controls in peach orchards
  • Glyphosate resistance / grower / agent, visual survey participation
  • Continue to inform agents/growers about Chili thrips as they may move into TN
  • Additional organic pest control evaluations/demonstrations

Research Priorities

  • Develop quick field test for SOD (Phytophthora ramorum). Designed to be rapid, simple, and inexpensive.
  • Development and refinement of economic injury level (EIL) for common crop pests.
  • Insecticide resistance management
  • Develop best management practices for nursery production
  • Review pesticide application techniques
  • Landscape level prediction of pest population dynamics
  • Insecticide seed treatments for cucurbits
  • Insecticide efficacy testing
  • Selective control of Johnsongrass in cool season grasses
  • Determine need for soil fumigation for vegetables and strawberries

Regulatory Priorities

  • Imported Fire Ant (faster registration of newer products, restrict movement of items from infested areas)
  • Allow additional products for control of glyphosate resistant weeds.
  • Enforcement of phytosanitary laws for interstate movement of vegetable transplants
  • Survey for presence and distribution of the potato cyst nematode complex
  • Pampasgrass (allow multiple control products)
  • Hay / regulate movement from southern states and southern areas of TN
 

NOTE: Advisory members indicated that Crop/Pest Profiles older than three years should be updated, if at all possible, due to changes in commodity values, acreage and new chemistries of products recommended for control.


Priorities Developed for Tennessee's 2008 Pest Management Information Network:

Extension Priorities

  • Educational programs developed for good ag. practices for food safety.
  • Sudden Oak Death, more descriptive symptomology materials for agent training
  • Proper placement of seed treatments (field crops and vegetables)
  • Development of additional fact sheets that are easily accessible
  • On-farm demonstrations / field days for proper calibration of spray equipment
  • Education programs for nursery growers for insect and weed control
  • Programs for Ambrosia beetle identification and controls in peach orchards
  • Identification and management of Dectes stem borer in soybeans
  • Glyphosate resistance / grower / agent, visual survey participation
  • Chili thrips, inform agents/growers they may be on their way into TN
  • Organic pest control evaluations/demonstrations
  • Educational programs for control of Plum Pox in the event it occurs

Research Priorities

  • Develop quick field test for SOD (Phytophthora ramorum). Designed to be rapid, simple, and inexpensive.
  • Development and refinement of economic injury level (EIL) for common crop pests.
  • Insecticide resistance management
  • Develop best management practices for nursery production
  • Review pesticide application techniques
  • Landscape level prediction of pest population dynamics
  • Insecticide seed treatments for cucurbits
  • Insecticide efficacy testing
  • Selective control of Johnsongrass in cool season grasses
  • Review Pesticide application techniques

Regulatory Priorities

  • Imported Fire Ant (faster registration of newer products, restrict movement of items from infested areas)
  • Allow additional products for control of glyphosate resistant weeds.
  • Survey for presence and distribution of the potato cyst nematode complex
  • Pampasgrass (allow multiple control products)
  • Hay / regulate movement from southern states and southern areas of TN
 
 

Advisory members indicated that Crop/Pest Profiles older than three years should be updated, if possible, due to changes in commodity values, acreage and recommended controls.


2007 Program Priorities for Tennessee

Extension Priorities
  • Educational programs developed for good ag. practices for food safety.
  • Sudden Oak Death, more descriptive symptomology materials for agent training
  • Proper placement of seed treatments (field crops and vegetables)
  • Development of additional fact sheets that are easily accessible
  • On-farm demonstrations / field days for proper calibration of spray equipment
  • Educational programs for control of Plum Pox
  • Education programs for nursery growers for insect and weed control
  • Update vegetable weed control recommendations and herbicide efficacy ratings
  • Programs for Ambrosia beetle identification and controls in peach orchards
  • Identification and management of Dectes stem borer in soybeans
Research Priorities
  • Develop quick field test for SOD (Phytophthora ramorum). Designed to be rapid and simple.
  • Development and refinement of EIL for common crop pests.
  • Insecticide resistance management
  • Develop best management practices for nursery production
  • Review pseticide application techniques
  • Landscape level prediction of pest population dynamics
  • Insecticide seed treatments for cucurbits
  • Insecticide efficacy testing
  • Selective control of Johnsongrass in cool season grasses
  • Review Pesticide application techniques
Regulatory Priorities
  • Imported Fire Ant (faster registration of newer products, restrict movement of items from infested areas)
  • Allow additional products for control of glyphosate resistant weeds.
  • Survey for presence and distribution of the corn cyst nematode
  • Survey for presence and distribution of the potato cyst nematode complex
  • Pampasgrass (allow multiple control products)
  • Japanese knot weed / restrict movement

2006 Program Priorities for Tennessee

Extension Priorities
  • Stress to growers the importance of testing soil pH to improve crop health
  • Increase On-farm demonstrations and farm visits by statewide and/or area specialists
  • Demonstrate timing of herbicide applications and their effect on weed control
  • Evaluation and correct implementation of treatment thresholds for insect pests
  • Insecticide efficacy comparisons
  • Demonstrations for proper calibration of spray systems
  • Demonstrations for beef cattle fly control
  • Educational programs for nursery growers for insect control
  • Pest surveys in fruit and vegetable crops
  • Demonstrate effects of pH on mineral uptake in field crops and forages
  • Demonstrate timing of fly control applications and their effectiveness in beef cattle production
Research Priorities
  • Fungicide efficacy for downy mildew control in pumpkin
  • Effects of currently available disease control products
  • Control of Phytophthora capsici in cucurbits (pumpkins)
  • Development and refinement of EIL for common crop pests
  • Resistant varieties for downy and powdery mildews in pumpkin
  • Test resistance of new varieties
  • Selective control for Johnsongrass in cool season grasses
  • Insecticide resistance management
  • Investigate more cultural practices
  • Investigate more controls for black shank in tobacco
Regulatory Priorities
  • Pampasgrass control in upper East TN
  • Streamline Recertification and licensing requirements

Funding for the national network of Pest Management Centers was authorized by Section 406 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998. As the result of a second competitive process in 2003, four IPM Centers across the United States were again funded in FY 2003, with the Southern Region Center located at the NSF Center for IPM at North Carolina State University.